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Federal Appropriations for Breastfeeding

Each year funding is allocated to a variety of federally funded programs that include breastfeeding support through the federal appropriations process. Appropriations for breastfeeding have helped build and strengthen critical programs and initiatives to improve maternity care practices, increase access to peer & professional support, ensure continuity of breastfeeding care, increase support for breastfeeding employees, and address disparities in breastfeeding rates. Funding relevant to the breastfeeding field are primarily included in the Labor-HHS and Agriculture appropriations bills. 

Opportunities for Action 

USBC is urging Congress to increase funding for the CDC Hospitals Promoting Breastfeeding line item in the FY 2022 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Related Agencies appropriations bill.

Your Voice is Needed: Take Action to Support Federal Funding for Breastfeeding

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Historic Funding Levels for the Hospitals Promoting Breastfeeding Program

 

FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015

FY2016

FY2017

FY2018

FY2019

FY2020

FY2021

Hospitals Promoting Breastfeeding

$7M $2.5M $8M $8M

$8M

$8M

$8M

$8M

$9M

$9.5M

Federal Program Funding in FY2022 Labor-HHS Appropriations Bill

 

Connection to Infant Feeding

FY2021 Enacted

FY2022 President's Budget

FY2022 House Bill

FY2022 Senate Bill

FY2022 Enacted

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Hospitals Promoting Breastfeeding

Funding for this program comes from the Prevention and Public Health Fund to support breastfeeding families in maternity care settings, communities, and workplaces. 

$9.5M

$9.5M

$9.5M

$10.5M

TBD

Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health

The REACH program works to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities through local, culturally appropriate programs, including breastfeeding support programs.

$63.95M

$63.9M

$73.95M

$70.95M

TBD

Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country

The GHWIC program includes increased breastfeeding as a long-term goal.

$22M

$22M

$27M

$24M

TBD

Safe Motherhood and Infant Health

Breastfeeding is included in the Perinatal Quality Collaboratives and Substance Abuse During Pregnancy programs within the SMIH program.

$63M

$89M

$119M

$103M

TBD

Health Resources Service Administration

Maternal and Child Health Block Grant

Breastfeeding is included in the MCH Block Grant National Performance Measures.

 

$712.7M

$822.7M

$868.7M

$857.7M

TBD

Healthy Start

The Healthy Start program implements community-based interventions to improve the health of mothers and children, including breastfeeding education.

$128M

$128M

$145M

$137M

TBD

Maternal Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting

The MIECHV home visiting program provides support for at-risk pregnant women and families, including breastfeeding support.

$377.2M

$377.2M

$377M

$377M

TBD

Rural Maternity and Obstetrics Management Strategies

RMOMS supports grants to improve access to and continuity of maternal and obstetrics care in rural communities by increasing the delivery of and access to preconception, pregnancy, labor and delivery, and postpartum services, including breastfeeding support.

$5M

$10.4M

$10.4M

$10M

TBD

National Institutes of Health

Panel on planning or conducting research specific to pregnant people and lactating people

Funding for NICHD to contract with NASEM to convene a panel with specific legal, ethical, regulatory, and policy expertise to develop a framework for addressing medicolegal and liability issues when planning or conducting research specific to pregnant people and lactating people.

-

$1.9M

$1.5M

$1.5M

TBD

Federal Program Funding in FY2022 Interior Appropriations Bill

 

Connection to Infant Feeding

FY2021 Enacted

FY2022 President's Budget

FY2022 House Bill

FY2022 Senate Bill

FY2022 Enacted

Indian Health Service

Maternal Mortality and Morbidity in Indian Country The Indian Health Service maternal health initiative works to reduce pregnancy-related deaths among Native American women and improve maternal health outcomes, including through lactation support. $5M $5M $5M $5M TBD

Federal Agency Funding in the Fiscal Year 2022 Appropriations Bills

Federal Agency/Division

FY2021 Enacted

FY2022 President's Budget

FY2022 House Bill

FY2022 Senate Bill

FY2022 Enacted

Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies and Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

$7.9B

$9.7B

$10.5B

$9.73B

TBD

Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity

$56.9M

$56.9M

$56.92M

$56.92M

TBD

Health Resources and Services Administration

$7.2B

$12.6B

$8.7B

$9.2B

TBD

Maternal and Child Health Bureau

$975.284M

$1.5B

$1.18B

$1.15B

TBD

U.S. Department of Labor

$12.5B

$14.3B

$14.7B

 $13.8B

TBD

Wage and Hour Division

$246M

$327.5M

$300M

$278.7M

TBD

Women's Bureau

$15M

$20M

$25M

$22M

TBD

Office of Minority Health

$61.8M

$61.8M

$75.8M

$66.8M

TBD

Office on Women's Health

$35.1M

$35M

$42.1M

$43.1M

TBD

Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality

$345.3M

$380M

$380M

380M

TBD

National Institutes of Health

$42.9B

$51.7B

$49.4B

$47.9B

TBD

Office of Research on Women’s Health

$43M

$52.3M

$61.5M

$57.4M

TBD

Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission $404.5M $445.9M $445.9M $424.9M TBD

About the Federal Budget Process

Each federal budget is developed for what is called a Fiscal Year, which begins on October 1 and runs through September 30 of the following year. Developing a federal budget begins with the President submitting a budget plan. The President's budget reflects the vision, values, and priorities of the Administration and sets the stage for the federal budget negotiation process.

Congress then develops its budget plan, called the budget resolution, to set a total amount for spending in the year ahead. The budget total is sent to the House and Senate appropriations committees, where it is divided among 12 subcommittees each charged with developing an appropriations bill. Appropriations Committees hold "mark-ups" for each of the 12 annual spending bills.

Once these bills pass both Houses, they must be "conferenced" to work out any differences between the two versions. House-Senate conference committees make final determinations and prepare a Conference Report. The Conference Report is then passed by the House and the Senate and sent to the President to be signed.

Learn more about the federal budget process.

USBC Analyses on Fiscal Year 2022 Funding and Infant Feeding